Saving weird and wonderful animals from extinction

The most amazing and unique species are often the most endangered

WAWA Conservation is helping to protect some of the most evolutionarily distinct and globally endangered wildlife on Earth. We work to support conservationists working in-situ and hands on with weird and wonderful animals of all shapes and sizes.

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Meet some of the incredible species and projects WAWA Conservation has supported in their fight against extinction

The saiga antelope and The Saiga Conservation Alliance

The saiga antelope is in danger of going extinct in our lifetimes. In 2015 the population faced a devastating blow when 80% of their population died suddenly of an unknown illness. Despite this decimating blow, the saiga somehow survived, but recent funding cuts mean this critically endangered species is running out of time. They simply cannot afford another hit.

The saiga antelope and The Saiga Conservation Alliance

The saiga antelope is in danger of going extinct in our lifetimes. In 2015 the population faced a devastating blow when 80% of their population died suddenly of an unknown illness. Despite this decimating blow, the saiga somehow survived, but recent funding cuts mean this critically endangered species is running out of time. They simply cannot afford another hit.

The Philippine Eagle and the Philippine Eagle Foundation

The Philippine eagle is one of the largest and rarest eagles in the world. This avian wonder is critically endangered and at risk of being lost from our world forever. Habitat loss and human conflict has meant that the remaining 400 pairs can only be found on four islands in the Philippines.

The Philippine Eagle and the Philippine Eagle Foundation

The Philippine eagle is one of the largest and rarest eagles in the world. This avian wonder is critically endangered and at risk of being lost from our world forever. Habitat loss and human conflict has meant that the remaining 400 pairs can only be found on four islands in the Philippines.

The scalloped hammerhead shark and the Galapagos Conservation Trust

In the past 30 years, the scalloped hammerhead shark population in the Atlantic Ocean has declined by 95%. Devastatingly, last year, they were listed as critically endangered due to its decimated population. If we lose the scalloped hammerhead from our oceans, not only will there be devastating effects on the marine ecosystem, we will have lost a unique piece of biodiversity that cannot be replaced.

The scalloped hammerhead shark and the Galapagos Conservation Trust

In the past 30 years, the scalloped hammerhead shark population in the Atlantic Ocean has declined by 95%. Devastatingly, last year, they were listed as critically endangered due to its decimated population. If we lose the scalloped hammerhead from our oceans, not only will there be devastating effects on the marine ecosystem, we will have lost a unique piece of biodiversity that cannot be replaced.

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